“Transformation” was a concept that was mentioned numerous times during Nintendo’s E3 presentation this year, but what exactly do they mean by it? The president of Nintendo of America, Reggie Fils-Aime, explained that the company’s idea of transformation branches beyond their Universal Studios partnership or their steps into mobile gaming. According to Reggie, it’s going to be a reoccurring theme in future additions to their beloved and better known IPs as well.

“We’re taking our great IP and transforming them and making them new again — making them fresh and appealing for the fan who feels they know the franchise. But we’re giving them new things to enjoy,” Reggie explained. However, this seemingly contradicts the negative outcry that came after the Metroid Prime: Federation Force announcement during E3. When asked about this, Reggie had much to say.

“What the fans at home saw was something in the Metroid Prime universe that they weren’t expecting. The reaction has been negative. There’s no sugar coating it. This is an example where fans who aren’t able to get their hands on the game may be at a bit of a competitive disadvantage. Everyone who has played what we are showing regarding Metroid Prime, they’ve come across really pleased. My ask is that fans trust us … We believe that in order to propel the franchises forward, we have to be the ones to constantly challenge the paradigms, challenge the conventional wisdom, challenge what we thought was the essence of the particular franchise, and a particular form of gameplay.” — Reggie Fils-Aime

Do you agree with the philosophy that Nintendo has adopted? Do you think that transformations are necessary for Nintendo’s bigger IPs to stay
“fresh and appealing,” or is it too big of a risk for them and their franchises should be left as-is? Let us know in the comments below!

Source: Mashable

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Kendra Robinson
My first introduction to video games was through my parents, both were avid fans of JRPGs. When I was a toddler, I'd watch my father play Final Fantasy VII on our PlayStation for hours and hours. I was enamored by all the sights and the music that the game had to offer. Shortly thereafter, I got the first video game I could call my very own: Pokémon Blue Version. It was through Blue-- with the help of my older siblings, who each had a copy of Red Version-- that I started to learn how to read... as well as come to learn just how much I'd love video games. Since then, games have become a very large staple in my life. I began to learn Japanese so that someday I could play games that weren't available in North America. I started playing piano and clarinet in sixth grade so that I could learn to play the video game music that I'd come to love so much--with particular fondness towards Koji Kondo's work in the Zelda franchise. Now I'm a college student with an instrument repertoire made up of 16 different instruments, and I sometimes write my own compositions in my spare time. Outside of Koji Kondo-san, my musical influences (in no particular order of preference) are composers Nobuo Uematsu, Yoko Shimomura, Hiroyuki Sawano, Keiichi Okabe, Motoi Sakuraba, and Hideyuki Fukusawa. Based in the Greater Vancouver area of Canada, I plan to do my best to bring the latest news in the video game world so that people like me can be brought together by a common interest-- or rather, passion. Hope to see you around!

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